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Searching for Meaning: Reading the Lord’s Prayer Closely

February 21, 2010

The Third Jean and Parker F. Wilson Seminar
2/27/2010( 8:30:00 AM – 1:45:00 AM )
Northway Christian Church, Dallas

Francisco Lozada, Jr, Associate Professor of New Testament and Latina/o Church Studies, Brite Divinity School

This course will explore the Lord’s Prayer in Matthew 6:9-13 and Luke 11:2-4 from a variety of critical perspectives, ranging from the Lord’s Prayer’s earliest version, history on how the Prayer came about, and its literary and theological background to the more contemporary perspectives relating to social justice and liberation reflected in the Lord’s Prayer. Framing the course is the theological question of how should Christians read the Lord’s Prayer? And what does the Lord’s Prayer teach us about how to engage global issues?
Francisco Lozada, Jr. holds a doctorate in New Testament and Early Christianity from Vanderbilt University. His teaching and research interests include New Testament Studies, Cultural Biblical Interpretation, and Latino/a (Hispanic) Theology and Church Studies. He is actively involved in leadership positions in the Society of Biblical Literature. He is a past president of the Academy of Catholic Hispanic Theologians of the United States (ACHTUS), a past teacher of the Hispanic Summer Program: An Ecumenical Program in Theology and Religion, and a mentor for doctoral students of the Hispanic Theological Initiative (HTI) housed at Princeton Theological Seminary. Dr. Lozada has published a monograph entitled A Literary Reading of John 5: Text as Construction (2000), a co-edited (with Tom Thatcher) book entitled New Currents Through John: A Global Perspective (2006), and numerous articles in cultural hermeneutics. He is currently working on a manuscript in Latino/a Biblical Hermeneutics and another in the area of New Testament Studies. Dr. Lozada is Roman Catholic.
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